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Take a Look at 20 Best Open-Source Security Tools

Tue, 10/19/2021 - 09:00

Over the past quarter of a century, the open-source movement has gone from strength to strength. But that success and the openness inherent in the community have led to a major challenge – security. The more software that is developed, the greater the likelihood there is for vulnerabilities.

To make matters worse, the open-source world prides itself on openness and transparency. Therefore, any security vulnerabilities are disclosed publicly. In this age of organized gangs of cybercriminals, that is like placing an ad asking for an attack.

This has given rise to a large number of open source security tools. They take care of all aspects of the management of security in open source components, examine dependencies, fix bugs in code, and lower risk.

However, the tools themselves vary considerably in scope, sophistication, and function. The editors of eSecurity Planet find the following 20 open source security tools to be particularly useful. Some are open-source, some are commercial, but all are good security options for open source environments.

The post Take a Look at 20 Best Open-Source Security Tools appeared first on Linux Today.

CuteFish – An Elegant, Beautiful and Easy-to-Use Linux Desktop

Tue, 10/19/2021 - 09:00

CutefishOS is a new free and open-source desktop environment for Linux operating systems with a focus on simplicity, beauty, and practicality. Its goal is to create a better computing experience for Linux users.

The post CuteFish – An Elegant, Beautiful and Easy-to-Use Linux Desktop appeared first on Linux Today.

31 Best Linux Performance Monitoring Tools

Mon, 10/18/2021 - 23:00

In this tutorial, we will learn the best tools for Linux performance monitoring and troubleshooting.

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The Open Source Security Foundation Receives $10 Million in Funding

Mon, 10/18/2021 - 21:00

The Linux Foundation has announced a $10 million commitment to the OpenSSF (Open Source Security Foundation), an effort to improve the security of open source software. Funds will be raised through royalties from parent companies of OpenSSF, including Amazon, Cisco, Dell Technologies, Ericsson, Facebook, Fidelity, GitHub, Google, IBM, Intel, JPMorgan Chase, Microsoft, Morgan Stanley, Oracle, Red Hat, Snyk, and VMware. Learn more about what this means for open-source security.

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Best Free and Open Source Alternatives to Adobe Photoshop

Mon, 10/18/2021 - 19:00

Adobe Photoshop is a raster graphics editor. Photoshop can edit and compose raster images in multiple layers and support masks, alpha compositing, and several color models including RGB, CMYK, CIELAB, spot color, and duotone. What are the best free and open source alternatives to Photoshop? Learn more about open-source graphics editors here.

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Microsoft Ported Sysmon to Linux and Made it Open Source

Mon, 10/18/2021 - 17:00

Microsoft has ported the Sysmon activity monitoring service to the Linux platform. To monitor the work of Linux, the eBPF subsystem is used, which allows you to run handlers that work at the kernel level of the operating system. The SysinternalsEBPF library is being developed separately, which includes functions useful for creating BPF handlers for monitoring system events. The toolkit code is open under the MIT license, and the BPF programs are under the GPLv2 license. The packages.microsoft.com repository contains ready-made RPM and DEB packages suitable for popular Linux distributions. Learn more about this open-source move for Sysmon here.

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Ubuntu Web Remix 20.04.3 Released

Mon, 10/18/2021 - 15:00

Remember Ubuntu Web? It was first announced last year in November as an alternative to Chrome OS or Chromium OS. It’s an unofficial Ubuntu flavor created by Rudra Saraswat, the maintainer of Ubuntu Unity, offering Web Apps, Android apps, and support for apps from the de-Googled /e/ Foundation.

While it has an emphasis on Web Apps, Ubuntu Web Remix looks and feels like a real GNU/Linux distribution that you can easily put on your desktop or laptop computer. It features the GNOME desktop environment by default, but with a minimal set of native Linux apps pre-installed. Learn more about this new Ubuntu release here.

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All Things Open: Diversity Event Today – Big Top Goes Up Monday!

Mon, 10/18/2021 - 13:45

As ATO moves back to being an in-person event, it’s not forgetting those who still need to stay at home — by live streaming the entire event, along with many hours of additional content only available online.

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PinePhone Pro Linux Smartphone Is Now Available for Pre-Order

Mon, 10/18/2021 - 13:00

The PINE64, the hardcore nerds behind Linux-powered hardware, has just announced the PinePhone Pro. The PinePhone Pro costs $399 and is designed to be user-repairable. The spare parts will be sold through the Pine Store.

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Here are 5 Linux-based Tablets

Mon, 10/18/2021 - 12:00

There are Linux laptops, Linux mini PCs, and Linux Phones. What about Linux-based tablets? What if you want to use a real Linux on a tab? Here are your options.

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Linux Kernel Concurrency Cheat Sheet

Mon, 10/18/2021 - 11:30

Navigating Linux kernel APIs can be very time-consuming, so Linux ksplice guru Vegard Nossum put together a very handy time-saving cheat sheet to help traversing Linux kernel concurrency primitives.

As a child, I spent countless hours playing games on my Nintendo Game Boy. As I grew older and started programming in QBasic on MS-DOS, I also got curious about how Game Boy games worked.

At that time, I didn’t yet have an Internet connection at home, but I spent a lot of time at my parents’ workplaces after school, where I had access to the Internet. I would frequently bring stacks of floppies and load them up with anything I could download — QBasic programs, shareware, and all the programming tutorials and documentation I could find.

One of the things I found was the “Nintendo GameBoy Crib Sheet” by Justin “Otaku No” Lloyd. The Crib Sheet is a 4-page document, meant to be printed, that is packed with information about Game Boy assembly programming — instructions, opcodes, memory maps, IO registers, etc. At the time, I didn’t really understand a lot of it, but I marveled at it and treasured it.

My dad worked at a printing business, so he had the equipment to print the Crib Sheet in A3 (roughly “Tabloid/Ledger” in US paper sizes), two-sided and in color, and laminate it.

I eventually learned how to program the Game Boy, largely helped by my printed and laminated Crib Sheet.

Since then, I’ve had a bit of a soft spot for cheat sheets. They’re not for everybody, and that’s fine. To me, there is something magical about seeing the essence of something distilled down to a tightly packed overview that fits in your hands.

That’s why I decided to make one for Linux kernel concurrency primitives (click on the preview to download the PDF):

In some places, you’ll see some circled, colored number references. Those refer to potential variants of a function, and the variants are usually listed just below the table of functions.

This cheat sheet is necessarily incomplete — Linux kernel APIs are too numerous and diverse to be able to include every detail. I consider the cheat sheet to be a handy reference and a good starting point for exploring the APIs.

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Malicious packages mitmproxy2 and mitmproxy-iframe removed from PyPI directory

Mon, 10/18/2021 - 11:21

The author of mitmproxy, a tool for analyzing HTTP / HTTPS traffic, drew attention to the appearance of a fork of his project in the Python Package Index (PyPI) directory. The fork was distributed under the similar name mitmproxy2 and the non-existent version 8.0.1 (current release of mitmproxy 7.0.4) with the expectation that inattentive users will perceive the package as a new version of the main project (typosquatting) and wish to try the new version.

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9to5Linux Weekly Roundup: October 17th, 2021

Mon, 10/18/2021 - 10:57

This week was all about Ubuntu 21.10, but we also saw some big announcements starting with the release of the KDE Plasma 5.23 desktop enviornment and the launch of the PinePhone Pro Linux smartphone, and continuing with several great distro releases like the systemd-free Devuan GNU+Linux 4.0 and KaOS 2021.10.

The post 9to5Linux Weekly Roundup: October 17th, 2021 appeared first on Linux Today.

The Ministry of Finance of the Russian Federation has Developed an Open License

Mon, 10/18/2021 - 10:52

In the git repository of the software complex “Data showcases of the NSUD”, developed by order of the Ministry of Digital Development, Communications and Mass Media of the Russian Federation, the text of the license entitled “State open license, version 1.1” was found. According to the explanatory text, the rights to the text of the license belong to the Ministry of Finance. The license is dated June 25, 2021.

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How to Install Apache Spark on Debian 11

Mon, 10/18/2021 - 10:00

Apache Spark is a free, open-source, general-purpose, and distributed computational framework that is created to provide faster computational results. In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Apache Spark on Debian 11.

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DearPyGui 1.0.0 User Interface Toolkit Released

Mon, 10/18/2021 - 09:00

Check out Dear PyGui 1.0.0 (the DPG), a cross-platform toolkit for GUI development in Python. The most important feature of the project is the use of multithreading and outsourcing of operations to the GPU to speed up rendering. The key goal of shaping the 1.0.0 release is to stabilize the API. Compatibility-breaking changes will now be proposed in a separate “experimental” module.

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How to Install MATE Desktop 1.26 on Fedora 35

Sun, 10/17/2021 - 17:00

In the following tutorial, you will learn how to install the latest stable MATE Desktop 1.26 on Fedora 35.

The post How to Install MATE Desktop 1.26 on Fedora 35 appeared first on Linux Today.

Stardust Systems Doesn’t Care if You Pay for its Product

Sun, 10/17/2021 - 16:00

Two networking industry veterans have launched a network observability startup based on an open source model, with users paying for a fully supported enterprise version if needed.

Dinesh Dutt, former chief scientist at Cumulus Networks and a Cisco fellow who helped design many of the networking giant’s ASICs, and Neela Jacques, whose background includes VMware, Barracuda, the OpenDaylight Project, and Isovalent, have co-founded Stardust Systems based on Dutt’s work on the open source Suzieq network management tool.

Neela Jacques, Co-Founder, Stardust Systems

Jacques, whose experience includes the OpenDaylight, eBPF, and Cilium open source projects, sees an open source business model as the best way to get their technology out to the market. His goal is to get Suzieq into the hands of as many users as possible, even if they never become paying customers.

“Some users will never pay for additional functionality, services, or support,” Jacques told Enterprise Networking Planet. “We think that’s the price of entry these days. We’re committed to giving users something solid of value, something they can use in production. We’re betting many of them will want more and happily pay for the enterprise version.”

Networks have never been more complicated or harder to understand — witness Facebook’s recent outage — and many network operators are afraid to make changes as a result.

“When a network fails, the outcome is spectacular,” Jacques said. “Most network operators don’t want to admit how fragile their networks are.”

Also read: The Future of Network Management with AIOps

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OpenBSD 7.0 Released

Sun, 10/17/2021 - 12:00

OpenBSD has introduced a release of the free cross-platform UNIX-like operating system OpenBSD 7.0. It is noted that these are 51 issues of the project, which will turn 26 on October 18.

The OpenBSD project was founded by Theo de Raadt in 1995 after a conflict with the NetBSD developers, as a result of which Theo was denied access to the NetBSD CVS repository. After that, Theo de Raadt and a group of like-minded people created a new open operating system based on the NetBSD source tree, the main development goals of which were portability (13 hardware platforms are supported), standardization, correct operation, proactive security, and integrated cryptographic tools. Full install ISO size base system OpenBSD 7.0 is 554 MB.

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Excellent System Utilities: Pingnoo – traceroute/ping analyser

Sat, 10/16/2021 - 15:00

This article looks at Pingnoo, an open-source cross-platform application for analysing and measuring the round trip time (latency) between two hosts. It offers a graphical representation for traceroute and ping output.

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